Studies

Study #2 CONTINUING A CREATIVE LIFE: TEACHING ARTIST’S APPROACHES WITH ADULT STUDENTS

Study #2

Abstract

How can we inspire and meet the needs of adult learners wanting to return, continue, or begin making art? Through semi-structured interviews, this study uncovered approaches, insights, and personal perspectives of four teaching artists from a various art instructional platforms. Though the teaching artists’ programs range from a state university, community art centers, to a national social “paint and sip” franchise with education backgrounds from a self-taught artist to a doctor of fine art, each was influenced by a special mentor. Their personal perspectives bring awareness to the field of art education for adults. This study is documented on a website, as well as an online resource magazine. The study’s website and magazine link are posted on several social media sites, so the study is accessible to other teaching artists of adult students around the world.   

 

Acknowledgements

Working on this research has been a wonderful and often overwhelming experience.  Although, I did receive much-appreciated support and encouragement from my primary advisors, Dr. Jodi Kushins, and committee member Patrick Grigsby.  I chose Dr. Jodi Kushins, for her expertise in alternative art education settings.  Her extensive knowledge in the area of alternative art education settings aligns with my research.  I chose Mr. Patrick Grigsby, for his outstanding approach to teaching adults and giving me the ambition and courage to be fearless with my art making. His positive outlook on art instruction aligns with my research. His exceptional teaching strategies and insights with adult learners were valuable. With their guidance, they made this a thoughtful and rewarding experience, and I am honored to have worked through this manuscript with them. Their comments and feedback helped me create an informative and interesting project with opportunities for future work.

Also, I thank the participants in this study, Mary Spires, Dr. Cesar Cornejo, Stuart Sting, and Bruce Kotchey for their time and voices in this study. It was a privileged to get their perspectives and insights on art education. Special recognition is extended to Paul M. Garton and his staff for their timely and accurate transcription service. Without their exceptional service, it would have been impossible to finish this manuscript on time. Finally, a big thank you to my four children, Anthony, Amanda, Ian and Graham for the richness you bring into my life and reminding me how grateful I am to be an artist, researcher,  educator, and mother.

 

 

New Structures for A Changed World in Higher Education

Study #1 The Underrepresentation of Women in Art History

ABSTRACT

            The purpose of this study is to examine issues that are thought to cause gender inequity in art history. Just as important, it investigates the question as to why women artists have more opportunities available to them today, but the statistics continue to show a discrepancy in women artist’s representation in art history. These findings guide the outcome of this study in constructing an art history courses based on the principle of the feminist pedagogy classroom. The course model provides a structure giving equal views, discussions, materials and literature on important men and women artists in history and will help even out discrepancies.

           Through narrative inquiry with four art historians and three women artists, this study uses feminist research to explore common theories, historical facts, and the many women artists that have been marginalized in art history. The findings show that their discrepancies in art history had religious, educational, economic, social and political implications. The voices of the women artist’s tell us of their struggles and successes. The artist’s narratives are used to determine the climate in today’s art world as support to the findings.

           This research will benefit the learner, adult education, higher education communities, and will help reform relationships between student and professor, build community, empower and privilege women artist’s voices. The outcome of the study is intended to ultimately create a more inclusive art history course for adult learners. This study is important to adult education because it supports the individual, creates a climate comfortable for discourse, growth, and sharing along with other benefits to both the learner and the facilitator.

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

           Working on this research has been a wonderful and often overwhelming experience. During the process I’ve grappled with how to write papers and proposals, give talks, work in groups, staying up until the wee hours of the night and still remaining focused. This dissertation is the result of a great deal of work on the part of many people over several years. In any case, I am indebted to many people for the time they extended so that this manuscript was an unforgettable an pleasurable journey.

            I have received support and encouragement from my primary advisor, Dr. Thomas Heaney.  With his guidance he has made this a thoughtful and rewarding experience and I am honored to have worked through this manuscript with him. I would like to equally thank my secondary advisor and committee member Dr. Scipio A. Colin, III, and my third committee member Dr. Iaroslave Babenchuk, both provided me with valuable advice. Their comments and insights created an informative and interesting project with opportunities for future work.

            During data collection and writing, Joe Boyum spent countless hours proof-reading and listening to me talk about my research. I have learned much through our conversations and he provided needed encouragement, insights and on-going support throughout the dissertation process, as well as the technical assistance critical for completing the project in a timely manner.

            I thank the participants in this study, Dr. Katherine M. Charron, Dr. Carol Damien, Dr. Roberta Favis, Mark Alexander, Ofra Friedman, Auburn Ellis and Cecilia Lueza. I have been very privileged to get to know and to collaborate with many great people who became friends over the last several years.

            A special thank you is extended to Paul M. Garton and his staff for their timely and accurate transcription service. Without their exceptional service, it would have been impossible to finish this manuscript on time.

            I received equally appreciated support and assistance from family and friends. I thank my mother for her moral and financial support and I dedicate this manuscript to my father and big brother who did not live long enough to see the completion of this study. Finally, a big thank you to my four children, Anthony, Amanda, Ian and Graham for the richness you bring into my life and reminding me how grateful I am to be a woman and mother.

 

 

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Joe | Reply 18.10.2012 03.33

The purpose of art is not simply to be shocking. Any homeless streetperson can do that. The purpose of art must be higher and remain higher than the gutter.

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Latest comments

31.10 | 18:33

Great job from Yolanda AND Norma

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18.10 | 03:33

The purpose of art is not simply to be shocking. Any homeless streetperson can do that. The purpose of art must be higher and remain higher than the gutter.

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11.10 | 12:45

ive didn't read all the articles but what I read are very affective

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20.09 | 14:39

There is clearly a need for Women's movement. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/omega-institute-for-holistic-studies/women-leadership_b_1894052.html

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